Critical Language and Literacy Studies

 
Series Editors: 
Alastair Pennycook (University of Technology, Sydney, Australia)
Brian Morgan (Glendon College/York University, Canada)
Ryuko Kubota (University of British Columbia)

Critical Language and Literacy Studies is an international series that encourages monographs directly addressing issues of power (its flows, inequities, distributions, trajectories) in a variety of language and literacy-related realms. We are particularly interested in studies of language and literacy that combine rich description within a strong analytical framework and an understanding of the uneven distribution of local and global resources. Our aim with this new series is twofold: 1) to cultivate scholarship that openly engages with social, political, and historical dimensions in language and literacy studies, and 2) to widen disciplinary horizons by encouraging new work on topics that have received little focus (see below for partial list of subject areas), and that use new theoretical frameworks. We welcome work from authors in parts of the world that are underrepresented in Western scholarship. Books may be single authored, multiple-authored or edited volumes. Proposals addressing some or any of the following topical sites are welcome:
 
- Literacies, pedagogies, identities, histories
  • - Language policies and practices; political discourses, grassroots movements
  • - Global, inter/transnational currents; transcultural flows and popular culture
  • - Diasporic, (im)migratory citizenship
  • - Local knowledges (“minority” voices, “vernacular and indigenous” literacies)
  • - Interdisciplinarity, hybridity, bodies, spaces; translations
  • - Standards, ‘standardizations’, language loyalties
  • - Media narratives (film, TV, print, advertising); new technologies

All books in this series are externally peer-reviewed.
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Proposals for the series are welcome and should be submitted to Anna Roderick. Please read our notes about how to submit a book proposal.
 
Please click here for our guidelines for turning your PhD thesis into a book.

Series results

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Jacket Image For: Growing up with God and Empire

Growing up with God and Empire

A Postcolonial Analysis of 'Missionary Kid' Memoirs

Jacket Image For: Scripts of Servitude

Scripts of Servitude

Language, Labor Migration and Transnational Domestic Work

Jacket Image For: Language, Education and Neoliberalism

Language, Education and Neoliberalism

Critical Studies in Sociolinguistics

Jacket Image For: English Teaching and Evangelical Mission

English Teaching and Evangelical Mission

The Case of Lighthouse School

Jacket Image For: Power and Meaning Making in an EAP Classroom

Power and Meaning Making in an EAP Classroom

Engaging with the Everyday

Jacket Image For: English and Development

English and Development

Policy, Pedagogy and Globalization

Jacket Image For: Language Learning, Gender and Desire

Language Learning, Gender and Desire

Japanese Women on the Move

Jacket Image For: Talk, Text and Technology

Talk, Text and Technology

Literacy and Social Practice in a Remote Indigenous Community

Jacket Image For: Language and Mobility

Language and Mobility

Unexpected Places

Jacket Image For: Style, Identity and Literacy

Style, Identity and Literacy

English in Singapore

Jacket Image For: The Struggle for Legitimacy

The Struggle for Legitimacy

Indigenized Englishes in Settler Schools

Jacket Image For: Examining Education, Media, and Dialogue under Occupation

Examining Education, Media, and Dialogue under Occupation

The Case of Palestine and Israel

Jacket Image For: ELT, Gender and International Development

ELT, Gender and International Development

Myths of Progress in a Neocolonial World